The Audition Report

Sketch22 held auditions this weekend for a new castmember for this summer’s production.  After it was all done, 17 brave people were wrung through our audition process.  A pretty good number, I think.
Before the weekend, I was a little worried that the vast majority of the auditioners would be, shall we say, less than qualified.  I expected that, for the most of them, it would be apparent, by the time they left, that they wouldn’t be right for the group.  I thought that if we had 2 or 3 people from whom we could legitimately decide, we’d be doing great.
In fact, quite the opposite happened.  Out of the 17 auditioners, I’d say maybe only 5 or so didn’t have what we were looking for.  Of the other dozen or so, it’s going to be really difficult to settle upon a consensus pick.  About a quarter of the auditioners were female, which was fantastic.  And even more fantastic, they were, for the most part, really strong.   Many of them had a prepared monologue to show us, some of them wrote their own.  All were very impressive.  Boy, it’s gonna be hard.   I think our task now is to try and agree upon maybe a top 3 or 4 of the dozen or so who really impressed us.
It won’t be an easy task, narrowing it down to 3.  And even tougher to choose that one actor whom  we hope will join us this summer.

Stay tuned, because, you know, this decision could affect your lives.

4 thoughts on “The Audition Report

  1. What a tremandous opportunity!
    Since Sketch22 knows what it takes to produce, why not assemble a second group from your auditions? (call them Sketch23, or the Second Sketchy comedy group) You could direct them and they could be booked based on the credibility of the Sketch22 brand.

    Seriously, if you were auditioning weed, and then got surprised by how much it exceeded your expectations – wouldn’t you smoke it all?

    Those talented untapped comics are like a big bag of really good weed. Why don’t you want to smoke them?

    Like

  2. The idea of assembling a second group from the auditions has been brought up. I’m not really in favour of that because a) the tremendous amount of effort it takes to produce one show is enough, b) it’s tough enough to assemble enough quality material for our show, c) in the end, wouldn’t it mean that both groups would be competing for the same entertainment dollar?
    Perhaps a more loose, less structured mid-winter production utilizing more of these talented people would be the way to go.

    Like

  3. I agree about the winter. It would be tough to produce a second group in the summer. But the talent is there, and I think if they could contribute on the writing front it would be fairly easy to produce a toned down winter show. Not that I’m one to talk about writing…

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s